Counsellors with Hearing Loss

Mental Health Counselling for

Adults with Hearing Loss

Sudden Acquired or Gradually Reducing Hearing

NHS (Wales – Scotland) – Self-Pay, Employment Support, Professional Organisations.

Hearing Loss Counselling for Adults with Mental or Emotional Health Conditions due to Reduced Hearing.

Counsellors & Psychotherapists who are either Hearing or have Reduced Hearing.

Affordable, Professional Disability Focused Therapy from Any Device.

Text, Chat & Video. Convenient, Discreet, Professional Online Therapy Anytime, Anywhere.

Mental Health Counselling for

Adults with Hearing Loss

Sudden Acquired or Gradually Reducing Hearing

Your Service

NHS (Wales – Scotland) – Self-Pay, Employment Support, Professional Organisations.

Hearing Loss Counselling for Adults with Mental or Emotional Health Conditions due to Reduced Hearing.

Counsellors & Psychotherapists who are either Hearing or have Reduced Hearing.

Affordable, Professional Disability Focused Therapy from Any Device. Text, Chat & Video. Convenient, Discreet, Professional Online Therapy Anytime, Anywhere.

Cultural Expertise

Hearing loss counselling can help you with your emotional & mental health; our therapists work with people with varying degrees of hearing loss. The therapy focuses on assisting you to overcome various psychological barriers.

Our team understands that living with reduced or suddenly acquired hearing loss can be difficult, but we know it can be manageable. Our treatment plans focus on helping you think more clearly & gain a purpose.

One of the most important aspects of psychotherapy is the relationship you form with your therapist. Using therapists with hearing loss will help you experience a sense of belonging and connection with similar challenges to yours.

Applying expertise and care, our specialist therapists support adults, teenagers, family members, couples & carers with expert counselling.

Ldy sat with a cup of coffee on her sofa. She is looking at her laptop having a disability counselling session.

Expertise

Hearing loss counselling can help you with your emotional & mental health; our therapists work with people with varying degrees of hearing loss. The therapy focuses on assisting you to overcome various psychological barriers.

Our team understands that living with reduced or suddenly acquired hearing loss can be difficult, but we know it can be manageable. Our treatment plans focus on helping you think more clearly & gain a purpose.

Culture

One of the most important aspects of psychotherapy is the relationship you form with your therapist. Using therapists with hearing loss will help you experience a sense of belonging and connection with similar challenges to yours.

Applying expertise and care, our specialist therapists support adults, teenagers, family members, couples & carers with expert counselling.

Man sat in a wheelchair with a ipad in front of him. The picture represents a cerebral palsy counselling session taking place.

Therapy

Hearing Loss Counselling is with therapists who have the lived experience needed to understand the complexity of being hard of hearing. Our therapy supports you with mental & emotional health issues to allow you to have a brighter future.

Our Service supports you with your mental health, whether pre-existing issues have worsened or a new condition that stems from hearing loss. Our specialist therapists understand the problems living in a hearing society when you have hearing loss can have on your mental & emotional health.

Therapy

Hearing Loss Counselling is with therapists who have the lived experience needed to understand the complexity of being hard of hearing. Our therapy supports you with mental & emotional health issues to allow you to have a brighter future.

Our Service supports you with your mental health, whether pre-existing issues have worsened or a new condition that stems from hearing loss. Our specialist therapists understand the problems living in a hearing society when you have hearing loss can have on your mental & emotional health.

Mental Health

There can be a connection between hearing loss and depression: When people struggle to hear, communication becomes challenging, and loneliness, sorrow and social isolation can quickly follow. For many people, anger is a significant factor. Some people hold this anger that consumes them; others have explosive anger lashing out in frustration. Many people feel discriminated against or ignored, reducing their self-worth.

We support people who have difficulties that include:

  • The everyday understanding of the conversation
  • The feeling of being able to hear but not understand
  • Having to turn up the TV or radio
  • Asking others to repeat often
A lady with brittle bones is sat in a wheelchair, she is researching from a book information regarding disability counselling

Mental Health

There can be a connection between hearing loss and depression: When people struggle to hear, communication becomes challenging, and loneliness, sorrow and social isolation can quickly follow. For many people, anger is a significant factor. Some people hold this anger that consumes them; others have explosive anger lashing out in frustration. Many people feel discriminated against or ignored, reducing their self-worth.

We support people who have difficulties that include:

  • The everyday understanding of the conversation
  • The feeling of being able to hear but not understand
  • Having to turn up the TV or radio
  • Asking others to repeat often

Impact

Sudden acquired or gradually reduced hearing can affect how you live daily and how you see yourself and relate to others. You might feel hopeless about the future and not burden others with your feelings.

These are typical responses; however, support, information, and effective counselling can help remove your feelings of dependence.

The emotional impact of hearing loss can make you feel sad, frightened, confused & angry, however, hearing loss counselling services with specialist therapists can help you through your journey with shared first-hand experiences.

Impact

Sudden acquired or gradually reduced hearing can affect how you live daily and how you see yourself and relate to others. You might feel hopeless about the future and not burden others with your feelings.

These are typical responses; however, support, information, and effective counselling can help remove your feelings of dependence.

The emotional impact of hearing loss can make you feel sad, frightened, confused & angry; however, hearing loss counselling services with specialist therapists can help you through your journey through shared first-hand experiences.

Funding Options

Referrals

Our Hearing Loss Counselling referrals cater for all types of requirements, you can contact us directly for more information or complete a self-referral form to move to the next step. We reply to you within 24 hours Monday to Friday.

NHS Applications

Hearing Loss Counselling Applications for Free NHS Funding

You firstly Self-Refer by using this link:  NHS Self-Referral

Once you have completed the form, you will be asked to attend a free counselling session; this session helps us make an application for you. 

No NHS application is guaranteed to be successful; we do, though, support most NHS regions in Wales & Scotland.

A typical timescale to start the sessions is 12 weeks from the date of the assessment session. 

Please let us know if you have any questions by contacting us on the form below this section.

Professional Organisations

We support many organisations with Hearing Loss Counselling including solicitors, employment support all the way through to smaller organisations that need support.

Contact us to find out more.

Self-Pay Plans

Hearing Loss Counselling Sessions are 50 minutes long and booked in advance.

We offer self-pay plans, including pay-by-session & saver packs where you can buy groups of 3 & 6 sessions at reduced price points.

Single Session – £50

6 Session Saver – £250 (£40)

Please contact us if you are in financial difficulties.

 

Mixed Plans

Being a major service, we can offer Hearing Loss Counselling with a mixed plan. This means you can start paying privately & then if or when funding comes in you can switch to a funded model of counselling.

Contact us to find out more

Contact us

4 + 14 =

Phone

+44 7539 877357

Email

info@disabilityplus.co.uk

Head Office Address

DisabilityPlus House, 25 Pembroke Avenue

Hersham, KT12 4NT

 

 

 

General Information

World Health Organisation

The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that more than 5% of the world’s population has disabling hearing loss.

Doctors will describe someone as having hearing loss when they cannot hear well or at all.

You may have heard the terms “hard of hearing” and “deaf” to describe hearing loss. But what do these terms mean? Is there a difference between them? In this article, we answer these questions and more.

What is the difference between being hard of hearing and being deaf?

The difference between being hard of hearing and being deaf lies in the degree of hearing loss.

There are several different degrees of hearing loss, including:

  • Mild: Softer or subtler sounds are hard to hear.
  • Moderate: It’s hard to hear speech or sounds at an average volume level.
  • Severe: It may be possible to hear loud sounds or speech, but it’s tough to hear anything at an average volume level.
  • Profound: Only loud sounds may be audible, or possibly no sounds at all.

Hard of hearing is a term that refers to someone with mild-to-severe hearing loss. In these individuals, some hearing capability is still present.

Deafness, on the other hand, refers to profound hearing loss. Deaf people have very little hearing or none at all.

Deaf people and those who are hard of hearing can nonverbally communicate with others in several different ways. Some examples include British Sign Language (BSL) and lip-reading.

Some of the symptoms of being hard of hearing can include:

  • feeling like speech and other sounds are quiet or muffled
  • having trouble hearing other people, particularly in noisy surroundings or when more than one person is speaking
  • frequently needing to ask others to repeat themselves or to speak more loudly or slowly
  • having to turn the volume up on your TV or headphones

In children and babies

Children and babies with hearing loss may show different symptoms than adults. Symptoms in children can include:

  • having unclear speech or talking very loudly
  • often replying with “huh?” or “what?”
  • not responding to or following directions
  • a delay in speech development
  • turning up the volume too high on the TV or headphones

Some symptoms in babies include:

  • not being startled by a loud noise
  • only noticing you when they see you and not when you say their name
  • appearing to hear some sounds but not others
  • not responding to or turning toward a sound source after they’ve reached six months of age
  • not saying simple single words by one year of age

Are there ways to prevent hearing loss?

There are several steps that you can take to protect your hearing. For instance, you can:

  • Turn the volume down: Avoid listening to your TV or headphones in a loud setting.
  • Take breaks: Regular quiet intervals can help protect your hearing if you’re exposed to loud noises.
  • Use sound protection: If you’re going to be in a noisy environment, protect your hearing by using earplugs or noise-cancelling earphones.
  • Clean carefully: Avoid using cotton swabs to clean your ears, as they can push earwax deeper into your ear and increase the risk of a perforated eardrum.
  • Vaccinate: Vaccination can protect against infections that can cause hearing loss.
  • Get tested: If you feel like you’re at risk for hearing loss, get regular hearing tests. That way, you’ll be able to detect any changes early.
Tips for communicating with someone hard of hearing

If you have a hard-of-hearing loved one, you can share in ways that make it easier for them to understand you. Here are some tips to keep in mind:

  • Try to talk in an area without a lot of background noise. If you’re in a group, make sure that only one person is speaking at once.
  • Speak at a natural, steady pace, just a little louder than you usually would. Avoid shouting.
  • Use hand gestures and facial expressions to explain what you’re saying.
  • Avoid activities that can make lip-reading difficult. These include eating while talking and covering your mouth with your hand.
  • Remain patient and positive. Don’t be afraid to repeat something or to try different words if they don’t understand what you’ve said.

The difference between being hard of hearing and being deaf lies in the degree of hearing loss.

People typically use being hard of hearing to describe mild-to-severe hearing loss. Meanwhile, deafness refers to profound hearing loss. Deaf people have very little, if any, hearing.

Hearing loss causes many different causes, including ageing, exposure to loud noises, and infections. Some types of hearing loss are preventable, while others can be present at birth or develop naturally with age.

Hearing Loss Explained

Hearing loss is common, particularly as you get older. 

It’s not always easy to tell if you’re losing your hearing.

Common signs include:

  • difficulty hearing other people clearly and misunderstanding what they say, especially in noisy places
  • asking people to repeat themselves
  • listening to music or watching TV with the volume higher than other people need
  • difficulty hearing on the phone
  • finding it hard to keep up with a conversation
  • feeling tired or stressed from having to concentrate while listening

Sometimes someone else might notice problems with your hearing before you do.

Information:

Hearing loss in babies

Hearing loss can be harder to spot in babies. There is a checklist for how a baby makes and reacts to sounds on GOV.UK that can help you notice the signs.

Causes of hearing loss

There are lots of possible causes of hearing loss. It may be caused by something treatable, or it may be permanent.

Your symptoms may give you an idea of what could be causing it. But do not self-diagnose; see a GP for advice.

Common causes of hearing loss and related symptoms.
Symptoms Possible cause
Gradual hearing loss in both ears Ageing or damage from loud noise over many years
Difficulty hearing in 1 ear, earache, a feeling of pressure in your ear, discharge coming out of the ear Ear infection
Difficulty hearing in 1 ear, itchiness, feeling like your ear is blocked Earwax build-up
Sudden hearing loss after an ear infection, a very loud noise or a change in air pressure (for example, from flying) Perforated eardrum
Sudden hearing loss along with dizziness, a spinning sensation (vertigo) or ringing in your ears (tinnitus) Labyrinthitis or Ménière’s disease

Treatments for hearing loss

Treatment for hearing loss depends on what’s causing it.

Sometimes a GP may be able to treat the cause, for example:

  • an ear infection might be treated with antibiotics
  • an earwax build-up might be treated with ear drops or removed

If your hearing loss is not caused by something a GP can treat, they may refer you to a hearing specialist for further tests and treatment.

Hearing aids and implants

If you have permanent hearing loss, a specialist will often recommend hearing aids. These will not make your hearing perfect, but they make sounds louder and more transparent.

Some people may need a hearing implant. These devices are attached to your skull or placed deep inside your ear.

Find out more about hearing aids and implants.

Our Specialist Therapies

Our Specialist Therapies